Uncle Milton 3-in-1 Space Explorer Telescope

Uncle Milton 3-in-1 Space Explorer Telescope

It’s a real working telescope like no other. Use it as a telescope or click to view stunning back-lit images from NASA. Press a button to hear three cool facts about each image. Product Description Explore the universe with this 3-in-1 telescope. This amazing tool takes little scientists on a space journey through 10 real NASA space images, and teaches them all about what they’re seeing through synchronized audio narration. Each image is accompanied by two to three fascinating factoids. Measures approximately 24″ long. Requires 3 “AAA” batteries (not included). Recommended Age: 6 – 12 years

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Would using two telescopes as a sort of giant pair of binoculars double the light we see?

Suppose I had an arrangement of two telescopes to look through with both eyes, would I see more light than if I was using just one telescope?
Perhaps, if not more light, using binocular vision will provide other benefits? For example, sharpness, clarity, or something like that.

You mean like this:
http://www.davetrott.com/GiantBinoculars.html

Because of the way your brain processes images a pair of binoculars produces an image more than twice as good as the image for a telescope the size of one half of the binoculars. But I think everything has to be very accurately matched between the two sides, you can’t just take two telescopes and stick them together – which is why you don’t see them very often; if at all.

What college is good for a graduate or maybe even a bachelors in astronomy?

I’m going to clemson in the fall, and i’m majoring in physics but they don’t have astronomy as a major or minor and not all that many classes in that area. Which schools do?

Actually, Clemson has quite a few astronomy classes – I’m doing my PhD in astrophysics there. I didn’t go there for undergrad, but they do seem to teach at least a few a year to undergrads.

If you want to apply to grad school for astronomy, majoring in physics is the important thing – you don’t need all that much of a background in astronomy, but spend your summers doing REU (research experience for undergraduate) programs. They are offered all over the country, will pay you and provide housing, and you might even get a publication of conference trip out of it. That will look great on grad applications.

Good grad schools for astronomy: Harvard, CalTech, Berkeley, UC Santa Cruz, U Chicago, U Hawaii, UT Austin, Columbia, U Arizona. A lot of it will depend on what exactly you want to do – stellar astronomy, galactic, extragalactic, theory, planetary, high energy, etc.

How do really powerful microscopes and telescopes work?

A microscope that is powerful enough to see atoms isn’t just using a bunch of carefully ground lenses, is it? At what scale do lenses reach their limit, and some other method of detection take over? What is it?

The same goes for the most powerful telescopes. Is it all just great big lenses, or at some point are lenses replaced by some other technology? How do we see the most distant objects in space?

Firstly, Bored At Work is incorrect about lenses. Lenses can be used to focus any electromagnetic radiation; that is how Scanning Electron Microscopes (SEM) work.

Secondly, SEM’s do project fine beams of electrons toward the specimen. Without going into any detail on the subject, the electron beam interacts in a way with the specimen (based on atomic weights of the atoms in the sample) that can be digitized by detectors and produced into a picture.

Telescopes use detectors as well. Electromagnetic radiation from space strikes sensors that convert that radiation into electrical signals that can be converted into digital images. The radiation is comprised of many different energy particles that the detectors read. The detectors are energy specific so that only particular particles can affect the detector and provide a reading.

What is typically covered in a college astronomy class?

I’m taking general astronomy in the fall and I don’t know what to expect. I’m taking 19 credits so I’m hoping its not a huge burden.
Is there a lot of math?
Is it factual memorization?

Really easy class and pretty interesting. My class involved no math. However, if your taking the lab it does involve some.

You should be fine.

How many diffrent types of telescopes are there?

What diffrerent types of telescopes are there and what are their different uses?
Just wondering cos there seem to be so many, there’s like telescopes in outerspace and enourmous ones down here on earth aswell as tiny ones you can buy in shops…

For astronomocal useage there are two types of telescopes, optical and radio.

Of the optical telescopes, there are two types also, reflecting and refracting.

Refracting telescopes are the common "tube" type telescopes that you look directly through and which have a lens on each end. Spyglasses and binoculars are made this way.

Reflecting (Newtonian) telescopes have a curved mirror at the bottom end and use the mirror as a lens to magnify the received image. The advantage for big ‘scopes is that the mirror is at the bottom so it is easier to build a support for it. The Hubble space telescope is a refracting telescope.

There is also a thrid kind of optical telescope that is sort of a combination of the other two that uses both mirrors and lenses.

In addition to ordinary optical telescopes there are also gamma ray and x ray telescopes that work on the extereme principles of refracting optical telescopes.

How to get enrolled in graduate astronomy?

I’m currently an undergraduate materials engineering student and I’m very interested in pursuing graduate studies in astrophysics. Is it possible, or am I required to have an undergraduate degree in physics or astronomy? Most of my courses are physics related, and I took linear algebra, differential equations, and vector calculus. However, I didn’t take quantum mechanics (strangely) or relativity. I appreciate all answers, and please if you can give as much details as possible.

Check the web sites of the graduate schools of interest to you. Or write for information, or call. Each school is likely to have its own set of prerequisites. Sometimes they are quite specific, sometimes more vague. An example is shown below. Note that at this college, only two semesters of general astronomy is required and that if you haven’t taken it as an undergraduate, you may take it as a graduate student but it won’t count toward your degree.

How to Buy a Telescope : What to Look for in First Telescope

A discussion of what make the best first telescope. Learn buying tips for telescopes in this free home astronomy equipment video from a telescope designer and manufacturer.

Expert: Bill Burgess
Bio: Bill Burgess is the owner and founder of Burgess Optical, which is world-renowned for its custom-built telescopes and planetary eyepieces.
Filmmaker: Dimitri LaBarge

Duration : 0:1:16

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NASA Astronomy Pictures Of The Week [3/2010]

NASA Astronomy Pictures of the Week (3/2010).


• http://www.youtube.com/Best0fScience
• http://www.youtube.com/ScienceMagazine

► Eclipse over the Temple of Poseidon
The Moon moved to partly block the Sun for a few minutes last week as a partial solar eclipse became momentarily visible across part of planet Earth. In the above single exposure image, meticulous planning enabled careful photographers to capture the partially eclipsed Sun well posed just above the ancient ruins of the Temple of Poseidon in Sounio, Greece.
• http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap100118.html

► Dust Sculptures in the Rosette Nebula
Noted for the common beauty of its overall shape, parts of the Rosette Nebula, also known as NGC 2237, show beauty even when viewed up close. Visible above are globules of dark dust and gas that are slowly being eroded away by the energetic light and winds by nearby massive stars. Left alone long enough, the molecular-cloud globules would likely form stars and planets. The Rosette Nebula spans about 50 light-years across and lies about 4,500 light-years away.
• http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap091202.html

► Watch Jupiter Rotate
What would it be like to coast by Jupiter and watch it rotate? This was just the experience of the New Horizons spacecraft as it approached and flew by Jupiter. Visible above in the extensive atmosphere of the Solar System’s largest planet are bands and belts of light and dark clouds, as well as giant rotating storm systems seen as ovals. The robotic New Horizons spacecraft continues to speed toward the outer Solar System and has recently passed the halfway point between Earth and Pluto.
• http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/astropix.html

► NGC 6992: Filaments of the Veil Nebula
Wisps like this are all that remain visible of a Milky Way star. About 7,500 years ago that star exploded in a supernova leaving the Veil Nebula, also known as the Cygnus Loop. At the time, the expanding cloud was likely as bright as a crescent Moon, remaining visible for weeks to people living at the dawn of recorded history. Today, the resulting supernova remnant has faded.
• http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap091201.html

► Dark Sand Cascades on Mars
They might look like trees on Mars, but they’re not. Groups of dark brown streaks have been photographed by the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter on melting pinkish sand dunes covered with light frost. The image was taken near the North Pole of Mars. At that time, dark sand on the interior of Martian sand dunes became more and more visible as the spring Sun melted the lighter carbon dioxide ice. When occurring near the top of a dune, dark sand may cascade down the dune leaving dark surface streaks — streaks that might appear at first to be trees standing in front of the lighter regions, but cast no shadows.
• http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap100119.html

► Eclipses in the Shade
Eclipses are everywhere in this shady scene. The picture was taken on the Indian Ocean atoll island of Ellaidhoo, Maldives, in January 2010, during the longest annular solar eclipse for the next 1,000 years. Tall palm trees provided the shade. Their many crossed leaves created gaps that acted like pinhole cameras, scattering recognizable eclipse images across the white sands of a tropical garden near the beach. From this idyllic location near the centerline of the Moon’s shadow track, the ring of fire or annular phase of the eclipse lasted about 10 minutes and 55 seconds.
• http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap100123.html

► Dust and the NGC 7771 Group
Some 200 million light-years distant toward the constellation Pegasus, NGC 7771 is the large, edge-on spiral near center, about 75,000 light-years across, with two smaller galaxies just below it. Large spiral NGC 7769 is seen face-on to the right. Galaxies of the NGC 7771 group are interacting, making repeated close passages that will ultimately result in galaxy-galaxy mergers on a cosmic timescale.
• http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap100121.html

► Millennium Annular Solar Eclipse
The Moon’s shadow raced across planet Earth on January 15. Observers within the central shadow track were able to witness an annular solar eclipse as the Moon’s apparent size was too small to completely cover the Sun. A visually dramatic ring of fire, the annular phase lasted up to 11 minutes and 8 seconds depending on location, the longest annular solar eclipse for the next 1,000 years. This picture of the Moon’s silhouette just before mid-eclipse was taken within the eclipse path from the city of Kanyakumari at the southern tip of India.
• http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap100122.html

► Himalayan Skyscape
Capella, alpha star of the constellation Auriga, rises over Mt. Everest in this panoramic view of the top of the world at night.
• http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap091205.html
.

Duration : 0:3:36

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Meade Instruments ETX-90PE Telescope

Meade Instruments  ETX-90PE Telescope
Until now, the stargazer’s two biggest challenges to enjoying the night sky have been aligning their telescope and finding objects. Meade’s new ETX Premier Edition eliminates these two challenges and makes astronomy as easy as pushing a button – right out of the box. Want to see a hard-to-find deep space galaxy? Simply push a button. The same goes for planets, stars, nebulae and more. Just pick an object you want to observe, press a button, and then AutoStar will automatically point your telescope and put it right in your eyepiece.

Don’t know what you want to see this evening? Go to the “Tonight’s Best” tour in your AutoStar. It automatically selects the best objects in the sky for that particular time and location (from its database of over 30, 000 celestial objects). All you need is a clear night, a dark sky and a little curiosity. Whether you already know the sky by heart, or are just beginning your journey of discovery, your Meade ETX-Premier Edition will take you where you want to go. Astronomy has never been so fun and rewarding.

Meade’s new ETX-Premier Edition automatically levels your telescope, points it to North and sets the time. You just enter your location or zip code. After your ETX completes its patented Level North automatic alignment procedure, it will point to the first alignment star. Use the new wide-field SmartFinder to center the red dot over the alignment stars for ultra-precise pointing accuracy. It’s that easy.

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Adventure BABIxplore Kit 12379

Adventure BABIxplore Kit 12379

Children often delight in exploring underneath things and slipping through narrow gaps and passages. This adventure kit will allow children to get away from prying eyes. Children can also climb up high to view the world from a different perspective. Features: – Consists of Stairs, Slide, Male Corner Tunnel, Female Corner Tunnel, Staight Tunnel and T-Shaped Crossroads Tunnel – Made from roto molded plastic – Use items on a mat (see ‘Related Items’) – For children ages 1 year and up -Floor Space: 112″” x 79″”

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Have telescopes been used to prove the moon landings by visually documenting the sites?

A lot of discussion has been made over the years about the possible "faking" of the moon landings. I think I remember hearing about the use of high power telescopes, on earth and in space, to verify that the lunar lander platforms and flags are at the sites of the landings. If that is the case, are there pictures available? If this is not true, why hasn’t such a project been initiated?

nope.not at all telescopes can not prove the moon landings they are not that powerful common sense

to the person above me the only thing a home telescope can see is the moon the moon is to bright to see a flag

What would be a few good online courses to learn about Astronomy?

Please if you could provide links. Also if there are any quality free courses please let me know.

I know the basics, but i want to learn much more. A course that covers a wide field regarding astronomy would be great. Any recommendations?

MIT puts a great deal of their course materials online for free – you won’t get any credit from following along, but you can’t get that for free anyway.

http://ocw.mit.edu/OcwWeb/web/home/home/index.htm

Meade Instruments 20085 Telescope

Meade Instruments  20085 Telescope
The advanced LNT Auto-align technology featured as standard equipment on LX90 and ETX-Premier models will be now integrated into Meade DS-2000 telescopes. Just turn on the power and the telescope automatically finds level, senses precise north, and inputs (factory calibrated) time and date. Then it races to the first alignment-star automatically without any user inputs or interaction.

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Discovery Ultimate Star Planetarium

Discovery Ultimate Star Planetarium

This product is exclusive to the Discovery Channel Store.View the night sky as it would appear anywhere in the world with this motorized indoor planetarium. As seen on the Today Show!Project 88 constellations; 12 celestial objects including 8 planets Pluto and its moon CharonUses super bright bulbs to project over 600 starsSearchable database with over 600 star facts and mythsInteractive talking computer and backlit navigational screenFeatures five modes for a variety of astronomy tours and settingsFeatures a one-hour timer so you can fall asleep under the starsIncludes AC power adaptor and 24-page full color instruction manualThis accurate computer-aided motorized planetarium transforms an ordinary room into a truly stellar display.Safety warning: This product contains small parts that may present a choking hazard for young children.

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Integral Space Telescope

Integral – Observing the violent and extremely variable universe.

A video by ESA regarding the Integral space telescope.

‘At the Science Data Centre of ESA’s Integral mission, in Versoix, Switzerland, scientists using the space observatory target and study known sources of gamma-rays.
But Integral is also designed to record serendipitous phenomena, or unexpected transient objects. The observatory plays the role of a sentinel alerting the worldwide scientific community about new and unusual high-energy events in the universe. When such events occur, data is sent to its owner before the scientific community is alerted. So that other observatories and telescopes also have the chance to observe the object in question.

Gamma-rays come from all around the universe, and when collecting data, Integral must filter point sources from background noise. For Integral, the level of noise in the gamma-ray environment is quite high. Poland’s Centre for Space Research helped develop the observatory’s noise reduction system — one of the satellite’s most important subsystems.’

Video date- 1st October 07 Source- http://www.esa.int/esa-mmg/mmg.pl?b=b&type=V&collection=Space%20Science&single=y&start=1

Duration : 0:5:9

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Velikovsky, Hero or Villain? Plasma Cosmology Astronomy

Velikovsky revisited, again. Dr Immanuel Velikovsky, Hero or Villain?

Plasma Cosmology Astronomy Carl Sagan Cosmology Space Electricity in space Electric Universe Wal Thornhill Dave Talbott Don Scott Petroglyphs rock art dragons and serpents celtic art spirals mythology myth plasma toruses comets venus mars jupiter saturn planets catastrophism catastrophes gradualism geology astrophysics alternative science scientific suppression peer review history of the solar system empiricism

Music By Delirium (First track) and Felix (Second and Third tracks)

Duration : 0:10:6

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NASA Administrator Keynotes Astronomers

NASA Administrator Charlie Bolden gave the keynote address at the 215th American Astronomical Society (AAS) meeting held in Washington, DC. With some 3,500 in attendance and more than 2,200 scientific presentations this is the largest astronomy meeting in history. Some of the topics discussed at this year’s event include black holes, exoplanets, exploding stars and pulsars.

Duration : 0:26:33

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Carson Dellosa Science Experiments: Earth Science CD-1816

Carson Dellosa Science Experiments: Earth Science CD-1816

Carson Dellosa Science Experiments: Earth Science CD-1816 Experiments in geology, oceanography, meteorology, and astronomy offer investigations into water salinity, radiation, planets, plus others. Carson Dellosa Science Experiments: Earth Science CD-1816 Gr. 5-8+ Model Number: CD-1816 Manufacturer: Carson Dellosa UPC: 44222115937

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Why are some Telescopes up out in space?

Why do we need to put some of the telescopes that use:

a. longer wavelengths either in dry areas on the surface or out in space?

b. shorter wavelengths in space?

The atmosphere distorts images and of course is where weather happens; you can’t use an optical telescope through clouds. Space based telescopes do not have this problem … they essentially have unrestricted views from outside our atmosphere.

Why can’t people understand that Astronomy and astrology are two completely different things?

Astronomy is a REAL SCIENCE that studies outer space and celestial objects in outer space.

Astrology is made up trash for the sole purpose of cheating people out of their money by telling them things they wish to hear and then making them pay for the pretty words. There is no real science what so ever with astrology.

Why can’t the astrology people stay in their ENTERTAINMENT section under Horoscopes and quit giving wrong answers for the real Astronomy questions?

Why?

Expect it to get worse too! I’ve got 50 years plus watching my country grow. The most pathetic thing I see? The education level in this country. My country has dropped to 12th down the list of most educated children in the world. too many cell phones, too much playing on the internet at school, too many ignorant parents who dont force their children to do their studies. Children in my country are so illiterate these days its NOT funny! What happened to the good old days when if you didnt do your schoolwork, you sat after school until it was finished?

Discovery Ultimate Star Planetarium

Discovery Ultimate Star Planetarium

This product is exclusive to the Discovery Channel Store.View the night sky as it would appear anywhere in the world with this motorized indoor planetarium. As seen on the Today Show!Project 88 constellations; 12 celestial objects including 8 planets Pluto and its moon CharonUses super bright bulbs to project over 600 starsSearchable database with over 600 star facts and mythsInteractive talking computer and backlit navigational screenFeatures five modes for a variety of astronomy tours and settingsFeatures a one-hour timer so you can fall asleep under the starsIncludes AC power adaptor and 24-page full color instruction manualThis accurate computer-aided motorized planetarium transforms an ordinary room into a truly stellar display.Safety warning: This product contains small parts that may present a choking hazard for young children.

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Up Close Footage of the Moon 9/8/08 – Nexstar 8 Telescope

How often do you get to see the moon this close up?? This is some footage I got last night, 9/8/08 of the moon. My Nexstar 8 telescope was magnifying the moon 120x, allowing the craters of the Northeastern and southeastern quadrants of the moon to be seen in detail. There was a cloud in front of the moon, however, I was still able to get some good shots.

Some sections of the video are actually more than 120X, since I also used the zoom on the camera. Knowing that, there may have been segments of the video where the moon was around 200-250X (~2X zoom on camera).

Sorry for the shakiness, but the mechanism for moving the telescope has a small amount of vibration and it’s difficult to use a digital camera in this way. Hope you enjoy!

Please let me know what you think and leave a comment or question under Video Comments! Also Rate the video if you enjoyed it!

Thanks for watching

Across the Universe Eclipse Galaxy solar system star jupiter saturn rings sun science Beatles Cluster Nebula orion amazing crazy spore game creature creator fun telescopes science nature astronomy star charts sky

Duration : 0:3:59

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Creation Astronomy Propaganda Debunked 01

The pilot episode of ‘CrAP Debunked’. If you liked this video, please help to spread it. Various images/videos produced by ESA/NASA/ESO.

Errata:
1. The phrase “Infinite volume hypothesis” is incorrect here. I meant to say either “Infinite density hypothesis” or “Zero volume hypothesis” (each implies the other).
2. Typo. The proton is in fact around one TRILLION times smaller than a full stop, not one billion.
3. Typo. This should of course read “..YouTube account”. Thanks to Agnostic1 for making me aware of that!

Please check out the giants of YouTube’s pro science collective:

Thunderf00t – Creator of the ‘Why do People Laugh at Creationists?’ series and many other fine videos.
http://www.youtube.com/thunderf00t

Potholer54 – Creator of the ‘Made Easy’ series as well as the new ‘Debunking Creationist Junk’ series.
http://www.youtube.com/potholer54
http://www.youtube.com/potholer54debunks

AronRa – Creator of the ‘Foundational Falsehoods of Creationism’ series.
http://www.youtube.com/aronra

DonExodus2 – Creator of the ‘How Evolution Works’ series and many other excellent videos.
http://www.youtube.com/donexodus2

Absent from the video but certainly no less important is cdk007! http://www.youtube.com/cdk007

Thanks for all your comments and suggestions. For those asking, the music used in this video in order is:
Chicago – Groove Armada
What We Need More Of Is Science – MC Hawking

Duration : 0:8:56

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Meade ETX-125PE Telescope

Meade ETX-125PE Telescope
Until now, the stargazer’s two biggest challenges to enjoying the night sky have been aligning their telescope and finding objects. Meade’s new ETX Premier Edition eliminates these two challenges and makes astronomy as easy as pushing a button – right out of the box. Want to see a hard-to-find deep space galaxy? Simply push a button. The same goes for planets, stars, nebulae and more. Just pick an object you want to observe, press a button, and then AutoStar will automatically point your telescope and put it right in your eyepiece.

Don’t know what you want to see this evening? Go to the “Tonight’s Best” tour in your AutoStar. It automatically selects the best objects in the sky for that particular time and location (from its database of over 30, 000 celestial objects). All you need is a clear night, a dark sky and a little curiosity. Whether you already know the sky by heart, or are just beginning your journey of discovery, your Meade ETX-Premier Edition will take you where you want to go. Astronomy has never been so fun and rewarding.

Meade’s new ETX-Premier Edition automatically levels your telescope, points it to North and sets the time. You just enter your location or zip code. After your ETX completes its patented Level North automatic alignment procedure, it will point to the first alignment star. Use the new wide-field SmartFinder to center the red dot over the alignment stars for ultra-precise pointing accuracy. It’s that easy.

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VISTA – The World’s Most Powerful Survey Telescope

ESOcast 12: VISTA – A Pioneering New Survey Telescope Starts Work.

VISTA (the Visible and Infrared Survey Telescope for Astronomy) is a new telescope that has just started work at ESOs Paranal Observatory in Chile and has made its first release of pictures.

VISTA is a survey telescope working at infrared wavelengths and is the worlds largest survey telescope. Its large mirror, wide field of view and very sensitive detectors will reveal a completely new view of the southern sky.

Spectacular pictures of the Flame Nebula, the Centre of the Milky Way and the Fornax Galaxy Cluster show that it is working very well.


• http://www.youtube.com/Best0fScience
• http://www.youtube.com/SagansCosmos
• http://www.youtube.com/FFreeThinker

VISTA is the latest telescope to be added to ESOs Paranal Observatory in the Atacama Desert of northern Chile. It is housed on the peak adjacent to the one hosting the ESO Very Large Telescope (VLT) and shares the same exceptional observing conditions.

VISTA’s main mirror is 4.1 metres across and is the most highly curved mirror of this size and quality ever made — its deviations from a perfect surface are less than a few thousandths of the thickness of a human hair — and its construction and polishing presented formidable challenges.

VISTA was conceived and developed by a consortium of 18 universities in the United Kingdom led by Queen Mary, University of London and became an in-kind contribution to ESO as part of the UK’s accession agreement. The telescope design and construction were project-managed by the Science and Technology Facilities Council’s UK Astronomy Technology Centre (STFC, UK ATC).

Provisional acceptance of VISTA was formally granted by ESO at a ceremony at ESO’s Headquarters in Garching, Germany, attended by representatives of Queen Mary, University of London and STFC, on 10 December 2009 and the telescope will now be operated by ESO.

Read more: http://www.eso.org/public/outreach/press-rel/pr-2009/pr-49-09.html

ESOcast is produced by ESO, the European Southern Observatory. ESO, the European Southern Observatory, is the pre-eminent intergovernmental science and technology organisation in astronomy designing, constructing and operating the worlds most advanced ground-based telescopes.

• http://www.eso.org/
.

Duration : 0:6:26

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KONUS 1780 Telescope

KONUS 1780 Telescope
KONUS provides high quality and functional products, supported by a complete service, in order to gain the total consumer satisfaction.

PRODUCT FEATURES:

Newtonian telescope with multicoated optics;

Diameter 114 mm (4″.5), focal lenght 500 mm (20″), focal ratio f/4.4;

Equatorial mount with RA motor;

Metal tripod 69

Europe’s Very Large Telescope (VLT)

The Very Large Telescope (VLT) is made up of four separate optical telescopes (the Antu telescope, the Kueyen telescope, the Melipal telescope, and the Yepun telescope) organized in an array formation, built and operated by the European Southern Observatory (ESO) at the Paranal Observatory on Cerro Paranal, a 2,635 m high mountain in the Atacama desert in northern Chile. Each telescope has an 8.2 m aperture. The array is complemented by four movable Auxiliary Telescopes (ATs) of 1.8 m aperture. Working together in so-called interferometric mode, the telescopes can achieve an angular resolution of around 1 milliarcsecond, equivalent to the gap between the headlights of a car as observed from the same distance as between the Earth to the Moon.

Duration : 0:5:14

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The Actual Astronomy of 2012 – Absolutely Amazing!

All my 2012 essays are here:
http://www.infinitelymystical.com/2012-essays.html

Since the Maya calendar and mythology are both based on the underlying astronomy, it can be very helpful to understand this astronomy. This is fun and easy to do as long as we take it a little bit at a time. It won’t take us very long to lay out all the information yet you may find yourself pondering this subject more deeply for quite awhile. For me personally, the more I dug into this material, the more mind-blowing it all became. Perhaps you will have a similar experience.

– Thomas Razzeto

http://www.infinitelymystical.com
Mystical spirituality for personal and world peace

Duration : 0:9:43

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what professions are there related to astronomy other than astronaut?

i`m only 16 but i am thinking about going into astronomy but i don’t have a clue what you have to do for it! it would be really helpful if you could mention uni courses to get into it? and how hard is it? any suggestions about NASA?

The joke when I was an undergrad applied mathematics was that the graduate astronomy students and junior faculty daily read the obituaries rather than the help wanted ads when looking for work.

One fellow undergrad, an astronomy major, cursed in my presence while doing a physics problem. He expressed his disappointment saying that it was too difficult for him to visualize more than 10 dimensions at one time. I said that I have a problem with 4 (I was in the process of flunking the div grad curl part of calculus), how could he do 10? Oh, easy, he said, x,y,z, and t and momentum and acceleration in the spatial directions. I believed him.

Study astronomy for the love of it. I was in kindergarten when sputnik went up and we all dreamed of being physicists and engineers and astronauts. Physics and math and more physics and more math should be your coursework. Take a few other sciences and engineering to see how the theory you are learning is applied–just for a breadth of education.

The Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena has summer programs for high school students. Try to get into one.

Amateur Astronomy Sky this Week ending November 28, 2009

Moon interfers with dark sky viewing this week unless you are willing to get up very early in the morning. There are some brief but fairly bright passes of the ISS in the early evenings. Still time to view Jupiter in the early evening. Mars is getting a bit bigger and brighter. It will be at opposition with Earth in late January. There is a transit of Io, Ganymede, and the GRS Friday evening. Might make neat video sequence for dedicated planetary imagers.

Duration : 0:5:47

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Will satellites or telescopes be able to watch the navy missile strike the spy satellite?

I wonder if earth based telescopes or orbiting satellites such as Hubble will be able to observe the navy’s attempt to shoot down the disabled U.S. spy satellite. That would very interesting to see footage of.

Hubble will not be able to watch the attack upon the crippled spy satellite, but the U.S military has had telescopes for decades that can observe satellites and other objects in space. Moreover, there has been programs to develop anti-ballistic missiles and live tests have been conducted over the Pacific ocean. Telescopes have been able to follow both the interceptor and the target vehicle until they collided and destroyed each other. If they shoot the satellite down while over territory where a space surveillance telescope can observe the attack, we will probably see footage on the evening news. Successful destruction of this crippled spy satellite would demonstrate not only to the American public but to potential adversaries as well that the U.S. can destroy a satellite in space in wartime. As a bonus, the debris will re-enter the atmosphere in a matter of weeks and will pose no threat to other satellites, the Space Shuttle or the International Space Station.

What are the top colleges/universities for studying Astronomy?

I want to go into Astronomy in my college/university years, and I want to know which school in (or near) Michigan have good schools for studying in Astronomy.

Central Michigan University is pretty good. Also Michigan State. But my top choice would be University of Michigan – Ann Harbor, it is world-class.

Actually, it really doesn’t matter where you study for the first two years as an undergraduate, if it has a good physics department. You can always get your Masters somewhere else, when you know what part of astronomy is most interesting.

NASA – Whats Up for April 2009

Whats Up for April? Did you know you can see other galaxies through modest telescopes or binoculars? Well you can!
Hello and welcome. I’m Jane Houston Jones at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California During 2009, were celebrating International Year of Astronomy by taking you on a tour of one of the months best celestial objects. This month, its the Whirlpool Galaxy!
Join me as we step away from our solar system, look beyond our own galaxy, and view the spiral arms of another galaxy.
Because we are inside our own galaxy – about two-thirds of the way from the galactic core, we can’t see the whole thing. But we can see the spiral arms and so we know we live in a spiral-shaped galaxy.
Early astronomers looked up in the night sky and saw patches of light which appeared like faraway clouds. They called these patches nebulae.
In 1845, Irelands Third Earl of Ross, William Parsons, used his huge telescope at Birr Castle in the center of Ireland to observe and sketch the spiral structure of the Whirlpool Galaxy.
Other 18th and 19th century astronomers, including father and son William and John Herschel, noted the structure of this galaxy, too.
A galaxy is an enormous collection of gas and stars held together by gravity. Since the 19th century, astronomers have aimed telescopes at galaxies, discovering their composition.
In the 20th century, NASAS orbiting telescopes have looked at this amazing galaxy to see it in many portions of the electromagnetic spectrum, from radio to infrared, on to visible light, and past visible to ultraviolet, X-Ray and on to gamma ray.

NASAs Spitzer Space Telescope looks at galaxies in the infrared part of the spectrum. It can see long lanes in the spiral arms. They are stars and gas laced with dust.
The Hubble Space Telescope sees similar views in a different wavelength. It looks at the optical part of the spectrum or what we think of as visible light. Thats the light we can see.
NASAS Chandra X-ray observatory reveals black holes, neutron stars and a glow between the stars of the Whirlpool Galaxy.
And last, but not least, the GALEX telescope shows that hot young stars produce a lot of ultraviolet energy.
Dont forget to view Saturn this month either. Its higher in the sky and easier to see.
You can read all about the Whirlpool and other galaxies in the distant universe this month on NASA’s International Year of Astronomy website: astronomy2009.nasa.gov
And you can learn all about NASA’s missions at: www.nasa.gov
That’s all for this month. I’m Jane Houston Jones.

Duration : 0:3:1

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